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This is a condition I am intimately familiar with because I have a form of muscular dystrophy known as Charcot Marie Tooth disease, so I will first provide what the research says regarding cannabis and muscular dystrophy and then my personal experience in treating my muscular dystrophy with traditional medicines as opposed to medical cannabis. Since my personal experience would have to be considered anecdotal and not research-based, make of it what you will. 

Muscular dystrophy encompasses an entire group of more than 30 inherited disorders, all of which cause the loss of skeletal muscle tissue and accompanying muscle weakness. Unfortunately, all of the disorders that make up the muscular dystrophy, or MD, group are known to degenerate or get worse over time.

As a result, keeping the patient comfortable and as pain-free as possible is often one of the most prominent treatment goals. Among the common members of the group of muscular dystrophy disorders are Becker muscular dystrophy, Duchene muscular dystrophy, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, Facioscapulohumeral Limb-girdle, Myotonia congenita, and Myotonic muscular dystrophy. 

This is a condition I am intimately familiar with because I have a form of muscular dystrophy known as Charcot Marie Tooth disease, so I will first provide what the research says regarding cannabis and muscular dystrophy and then my personal experience in treating my muscular dystrophy with traditional medicines as opposed to medical cannabis. Since my personal experience would have to be considered anecdotal and not research-based, make of it what you will. 

Muscular dystrophy encompasses an entire group of more than 30 inherited disorders, all of which cause the loss of skeletal muscle tissue and accompanying muscle weakness. Unfortunately, all of the disorders that make up the muscular dystrophy, or MD, group are known to degenerate or get worse over time. As a result, keeping the patient comfortable and as pain-free as possible is often one of the most prominent treatment goals. Among the common members of the group of muscular dystrophy disorders are Becker muscular dystrophy, Duchene muscular dystrophy, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, Facioscapulohumeral Limb-girdle, Myotonia congenita, and Myotonic muscular dystrophy. 

Medical Cannabis and Muscular Dystrophy

Muscular dystrophy itself does not typically cause severe pain; however, secondary chronic pain associated with the disorders affects two-thirds of the sufferers. Pain is caused by muscle cramps or spasms and stiff joints, pressure sores, and muscle twitches. While traditional treatments such as physical therapy, heat application, and exercise can alleviate some of the pain associated with MD, narcotic pain medication is often required at some point. Opiates, the group of pain medications typically prescribed for chronic pain, can help alleviate pain; however, they also come at a high cost. Side effects of opiate-based drugs can be severe and dangerous. Aside from the risk of addiction, opiate-based pain medications can also cause severe constipation, dizziness, drowsiness, respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, difficulty urinating, itching, and other adverse side effects. In addition, patients who use opiate-based narcotic pain medications typically build up a tolerance to the drug relatively quickly, meaning more of the same medicine is needed to control the pain.

Medical cannabis may help MD sufferers who live with chronic pain avoid building up a never-ending tolerance to opiate-based pain medication. A recent study looked at the effect of adding medical cannabis to the daily regime of patients who consume opiate-based pain medication for chronic pain. The study found that the participants experienced an average drop in the pain level of 27 percent while not significantly affecting the blood levels of the prescription drugs. In particular, excessive levels of opiates in the blood can be hazardous for muscular dystrophy patients, given the respiratory problems common to people living with muscular dystrophy. The fact that medical cannabis was able to reduce pain levels without increasing opiate blood levels is essential.

Unfortunately, there is no known cure for muscular dystrophy. Conventional treatment attempts to control seizures and muscle spasms and provide physical, respiratory, and speech therapy to give the patient the best quality of life possible.

My Experience

Let me begin by saying that while the researchers claim that muscular dystrophy itself does not typically cause severe pain, my personal experience is that it does, and I’ve talked with many muscular dystrophy patients who agree. 

Because of my personal experience with muscular dystrophy coupled with my firsthand experience with traditional medical treatment techniques for muscular dystrophy, I feel I am one of the most qualified people in the world to provide information for treating the symptoms of this condition. I am about to tell you how the failure of traditional medicine led me into the education aspect of the medical cannabis industry. 

I was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy at the age of four (a diagnosis for which I will be eternally grateful), and as a young adult, I was started on a series of opiates to treat the pain associated with my condition. I quickly developed a tolerance to them and was prescribed increasingly powerful varieties and doses as is typically recommended for the disease. In no particular order, I went through Fentanyl, OxyContin, Hydrocodone, Vicodin, and Codeine; finally, I was prescribed 500 mg of Morphine per day. This dose caused me to suffer a stroke and lose the use of my left arm.  

My left arm currently experiences what some doctors misdiagnose as spasticity, and I now tell a story of how prescription medicines caused every medical problem I currently have because I was put on a drug called Baclofen (a medication to address the spasticity which caused me to have a seizure when I was driving and smash into a bridge knocking out a significant number of my teeth). This detail will become meaningful when we get to the section on MRSA.

There were times on the opiates when I was so high I couldn’t engage in a coherent conversation. I was on Hospice for many months in Arizona (Hospice is the group they give you to when doctors have given up and you’re going to die).  My family brought me out of Arizona and put me in an Illinois Federal Government Housing Facility so I was close to them and could take care of me while I died.  Generally, when I make this statement, people tend to have a somewhat visceral reaction, but you have to understand, in death situations, family members have to adapt in ways that provide themselves methods of dealing with the circumstances and allowing their own lives to continue. It’s natural. This also allowed me the time necessary to deal with my situation and figure out how to handle it.

At the time I wasn’t particularly interested in dying. So I started researching alternatives. One of the alternatives I researched was medicinal cannabis.  I hadn’t consumed any cannabis since college, and unlike Bill Clinton, in college, I inhaled deeply and frequently.  I was eventually able to obtain a supply of medicinal cannabis from a friend from Colorado.
It worked for me. It took me a couple of weeks to wean myself off of the morphine, and the cannabis took care of any pain issues I was experiencing, and currently, it’s the only thing with which I medicate. 

Because of my experience, I am a big believer in vaporization combating the pain associated with muscular dystrophy. The only real experience I have with Full Extract Cannabis Oils (FECO) is because of extensive oral surgery to correct the problem resulting from the Baclofen. FECO is a cannabis medication that is exceptionally beneficial for managing extreme discomfort such as post-surgical pain. My oral surgeon was pushing the opiates(like any good drug dealer) even though I told him I was a medical cannabis patient and had some excellent pain management techniques. I later threw his prescription away. 

Molecules to target muscular dystrophy 

The strain I use for muscular dystrophy has a THC percentage of about 15% because it is a primary painkilling molecule in cannabis, but the psychoactive effect is mitigated by a high CBD ratio and low dosing regimen. As an aside, even though THC is highly psychoactive, it is the only cannabinoid the Federal Government currently allows doctors to prescribe (in the form of Marinol). 

When I evaluate a strain, the first molecule I look for is not THC but CBD. I also look for the CBG molecule because it stimulates brain cell growth, and as my sister recently told me, I need more brain cells. It also synergizes the other cannabinoids. I avoid the THCV molecule because I am pretty skinny and am not interested in suppressing my appetite.

For the essential oils (terpenes), I am interested in remaining focused on my tasks, so I target pinene, and I like to be happy (which seems to be the mission of limonene). In addition, in this industry, it is beneficial to remain calm, and when the federal government and pharmaceutical companies say they’re coming after you, the oil found in the lavender plant (linalool) tends to have that calming effect. Also, I struggle with insomnia, and myrcene tends to help with that. It also synergizes the effects of the other terpenes. 

Dosing for muscular dystrophy

I vaporize with about three milligrams of dried cannabis per day. This is about half the size of a dime and about a quarter as thick. I now treat the pain I once treated with 500 milligrams of oral morphine with this much medical cannabis. Because I vaporize it, I get the medicinal benefits immediately and don’t have to wait an hour for an oral dose of morphine to kick in.

 I favor the Blue Dream strain (the Bayer Aspirin of cannabis) because, at the amount I dose with, it doesn’t get me high, and I can work on any projects I might have (like writing this book).

Methods of ingestion

Vaporizing cannabis is the most effective and rapid mechanism for relaying the active compounds to the brain, thereby allowing the sufferer to feel immediate relief from pain and offering better control over medication levels. An MD sufferer may have a particularly compromised respiratory system, and so smoking is not recommended. Because the active compounds in cannabis, known as cannabinoids, are volatile, they can be vaporized at a temperature level significantly lower than that needed to reach combustion or smoke. As a result, hot air can be drawn through the dried flower, which vaporizes the cannabinoids and frees them for inhalation.

Medical cannabis may help MD sufferers who live with chronic pain avoid building up a never-ending tolerance to opiate-based pain medication. A recent study looked at the effect of adding medical cannabis to the daily regime of patients who consume opiate-based pain medication for chronic pain. The study found that the participants experienced an average drop in the pain level of 27 percent while not significantly affecting the blood levels of the prescription drugs. In particular, excessive levels of opiates in the blood can be hazardous for muscular dystrophy patients, given the respiratory problems common to people living with muscular dystrophy. The fact that medical cannabis was able to reduce pain levels without increasing opiate blood levels is essential.

Unfortunately, there is no known cure for muscular dystrophy. Conventional treatment attempts to control seizures and muscle spasms and provide physical, respiratory, and speech therapy to give the patient the best quality of life possible.

My Experience

Let me begin by saying that while the researchers claim that muscular dystrophy itself does not typically cause severe pain, my personal experience is that it does, and I’ve talked with many muscular dystrophy patients who agree. 

Because of my personal experience with muscular dystrophy coupled with my firsthand experience with traditional medical treatment techniques for muscular dystrophy, I feel I am one of the most qualified people in the world to provide information for treating the symptoms of this condition. I am about to tell you how the failure of traditional medicine led me into the education aspect of the medical cannabis industry. 

I was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy at the age of four (a diagnosis for which I will be eternally grateful), and as a young adult, I was started on a series of opiates to treat the pain associated with my condition. I quickly developed a tolerance to them and was prescribed increasingly powerful varieties and doses as is typically recommended for the disease. In no particular order, I went through Fentanyl, OxyContin, Hydrocodone, Vicodin, and Codeine; finally, I was prescribed 500 mg of Morphine per day. This dose caused me to suffer a stroke and lose the use of my left arm.  

My left arm currently experiences what some doctors misdiagnose as spasticity, and I now tell a story of how prescription medicines caused every medical problem I currently have because I was put on a drug called Baclofen (a medication to address the spasticity which caused me to have a seizure when I was driving and smash into a bridge knocking out a significant number of my teeth). This detail will become meaningful when we get to the section on MRSA.

There were times on the opiates when I was so high I couldn’t engage in a coherent conversation. I was on Hospice for many months in Arizona (Hospice is the group they give you to when doctors have given up and you’re going to die).  My family brought me out of Arizona and put me in an Illinois Federal Government Housing Facility so I was close to them and could take care of me while I died.  Generally, when I make this statement, people tend to have a somewhat visceral reaction, but you have to understand, in death situations, family members have to adapt in ways that provide themselves methods of dealing with the circumstances and allowing their own lives to continue. It’s natural. This also allowed me the time necessary to deal with my situation and figure out how to handle it.

At the time I wasn’t particularly interested in dying. So I started researching alternatives. One of the alternatives I researched was medicinal cannabis.  I hadn’t consumed any cannabis since college, and unlike Bill Clinton, in college, I inhaled deeply and frequently.  I was eventually able to obtain a supply of medicinal cannabis from a friend from Colorado.
It worked for me. It took me a couple of weeks to wean myself off of the morphine, and the cannabis took care of any pain issues I was experiencing, and currently, it’s the only thing with which I medicate. 

Because of my experience, I am a big believer in vaporization combating the pain associated with muscular dystrophy. The only real experience I have with Full Extract Cannabis Oils (FECO) is because of extensive oral surgery to correct the problem resulting from the Baclofen. FECO is a cannabis medication that is exceptionally beneficial for managing extreme discomfort such as post-surgical pain. My oral surgeon was pushing the opiates(like any good drug dealer) even though I told him I was a medical cannabis patient and had some excellent pain management techniques. I later threw his prescription away. 

Molecules to target muscular dystrophy 

The strain I use for muscular dystrophy has a THC percentage of about 15% because it is a primary painkilling molecule in cannabis, but the psychoactive effect is mitigated by a high CBD ratio and low dosing regimen. As an aside, even though THC is highly psychoactive, it is the only cannabinoid the Federal Government currently allows doctors to prescribe (in the form of Marinol). 

When I evaluate a strain, the first molecule I look for is not THC but CBD. I also look for the CBG molecule because it stimulates brain cell growth, and as my sister recently told me, I need more brain cells. It also synergizes the other cannabinoids. I avoid the THCV molecule because I am pretty skinny and am not interested in suppressing my appetite.

For the essential oils (terpenes), I am interested in remaining focused on my tasks, so I target pinene, and I like to be happy (which seems to be the mission of limonene). In addition, in this industry, it is beneficial to remain calm, and when the federal government and pharmaceutical companies say they’re coming after you, the oil found in the lavender plant (linalool) tends to have that calming effect. Also, I struggle with insomnia, and myrcene tends to help with that. It also synergizes the effects of the other terpenes. 

Dosing for muscular dystrophy

I vaporize with about three milligrams of dried cannabis per day. This is about half the size of a dime and about a quarter as thick. I now treat the pain I once treated with 500 milligrams of oral morphine with this much medical cannabis. Because I vaporize it, I get the medicinal benefits immediately and don’t have to wait an hour for an oral dose of morphine to kick in.

 I favor the Blue Dream strain (the Bayer Aspirin of cannabis) because, at the amount I dose with, it doesn’t get me high, and I can work on any projects I might have (like writing this book).

Methods of ingestion

Vaporizing cannabis is the most effective and rapid mechanism for relaying the active compounds to the brain, thereby allowing the sufferer to feel immediate relief from pain and offering better control over medication levels. An MD sufferer may have a particularly compromised respiratory system, and so smoking is not recommended. Because the active compounds in cannabis, known as cannabinoids, are volatile, they can be vaporized at a temperature level significantly lower than that needed to reach combustion or smoke. As a result, hot air can be drawn through the dried flower, which vaporizes the cannabinoids and frees them for inhalation.

My Experience

Let me begin by saying that while the researchers claim that muscular dystrophy itself does not typically cause severe pain, my personal experience is that it does, and I’ve talked with many muscular dystrophy patients who agree. 

Because of my personal experience with muscular dystrophy coupled with my firsthand experience with traditional medical treatment techniques for muscular dystrophy, I feel I am one of the most qualified people in the world to provide information for treating the symptoms of this condition. I am about to tell you how the failure of traditional medicine led me into the education aspect of the medical cannabis industry. 

I was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy at the age of four (a diagnosis for which I will be eternally grateful), and as a young adult, I was started on a series of opiates to treat the pain associated with my condition. I quickly developed a tolerance to them and was prescribed increasingly powerful varieties and doses as is typically recommended for the disease. In no particular order, I went through Fentanyl, OxyContin, Hydrocodone, Vicodin, and Codeine; finally, I was prescribed 500 mg of Morphine per day. This dose caused me to suffer a stroke and lose the use of my left arm.  

My left arm currently experiences what some doctors misdiagnose as spasticity, and I now tell a story of how prescription medicines caused every medical problem I currently have because I was put on a drug called Baclofen (a medication to address the spasticity which caused me to have a seizure when I was driving and smash into a bridge knocking out a significant number of my teeth). This detail will become meaningful when we get to the section on MRSA.

There were times on the opiates when I was so high I couldn’t engage in a coherent conversation. I was on Hospice for many months in Arizona (Hospice is the group they give you to when doctors have given up and you’re going to die).  My family brought me out of Arizona and put me in an Illinois Federal Government Housing Facility so I was close to them and could take care of me while I died.  Generally, when I make this statement, people tend to have a somewhat visceral reaction, but you have to understand, in death situations, family members have to adapt in ways that provide themselves methods of dealing with the circumstances and allowing their own lives to continue. It’s natural. This also allowed me the time necessary to deal with my situation and figure out how to handle it.

At the time I wasn’t particularly interested in dying. So I started researching alternatives. One of the alternatives I researched was medicinal cannabis.  I hadn’t consumed any cannabis since college, and unlike Bill Clinton, in college, I inhaled deeply and frequently.  I was eventually able to obtain a supply of medicinal cannabis from a friend from Colorado.
It worked for me. It took me a couple of weeks to wean myself off of the morphine, and the cannabis took care of any pain issues I was experiencing, and currently, it’s the only thing with which I medicate. 

Because of my experience, I am a big believer in vaporization combating the pain associated with muscular dystrophy. The only real experience I have with Full Extract Cannabis Oils (FECO) is because of extensive oral surgery to correct the problem resulting from the Baclofen. FECO is a cannabis medication that is exceptionally beneficial for managing extreme discomfort such as post-surgical pain. My oral surgeon was pushing the opiates(like any good drug dealer) even though I told him I was a medical cannabis patient and had some excellent pain management techniques. I later threw his prescription away. 

Molecules to target muscular dystrophy 

The strain I use for muscular dystrophy has a THC percentage of about 15% because it is a primary painkilling molecule in cannabis, but the psychoactive effect is mitigated by a high CBD ratio and low dosing regimen. As an aside, even though THC is highly psychoactive, it is the only cannabinoid the Federal Government currently allows doctors to prescribe (in the form of Marinol). 

When I evaluate a strain, the first molecule I look for is not THC but CBD. I also look for the CBG molecule because it stimulates brain cell growth, and as my sister recently told me, I need more brain cells. It also synergizes the other cannabinoids. I avoid the THCV molecule because I am pretty skinny and am not interested in suppressing my appetite.

For the essential oils (terpenes), I am interested in remaining focused on my tasks, so I target pinene, and I like to be happy (which seems to be the mission of limonene). In addition, in this industry, it is beneficial to remain calm, and when the federal government and pharmaceutical companies say they’re coming after you, the oil found in the lavender plant (linalool) tends to have that calming effect. Also, I struggle with insomnia, and myrcene tends to help with that. It also synergizes the effects of the other terpenes. 

Dosing for muscular dystrophy

I vaporize with about three milligrams of dried cannabis per day. This is about half the size of a dime and about a quarter as thick. I now treat the pain I once treated with 500 milligrams of oral morphine with this much medical cannabis. Because I vaporize it, I get the medicinal benefits immediately and don’t have to wait an hour for an oral dose of morphine to kick in.

 I favor the Blue Dream strain (the Bayer Aspirin of cannabis) because, at the amount I dose with, it doesn’t get me high, and I can work on any projects I might have (like writing this book).

Methods of ingestion

Vaporizing cannabis is the most effective and rapid mechanism for relaying the active compounds to the brain, thereby allowing the sufferer to feel immediate relief from pain and offering better control over medication levels. An MD sufferer may have a particularly compromised respiratory system, and so smoking is not recommended. Because the active compounds in cannabis, known as cannabinoids, are volatile, they can be vaporized at a temperature level significantly lower than that needed to reach combustion or smoke. As a result, hot air can be drawn through the dried flower, which vaporizes the cannabinoids and frees them for inhalation.